Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Jason Swift

Jason Swift

In 1985, 14-year-old Jason Swift was killed by a child-abuse gang.

Jason is believed to have lived in Islington council's Conewood Street children's home. (Jersey child abuse link to Islington, London)

Sidney Cooke, Leslie Bailey, Robert Oliver, and Lennie Smith, were imprisoned in 1989 for the manslaughter of Jason Swift.

Cooke and his gang had sexually tortured and prostituted a number of boys.

The gang is believed to have killed at least nine children.[2]

Cooke was sentenced to 19 years in prison.

In 1998, Cooke was let out of prison eight years early.

There have been allegations that very powerful people have been involved in a child-abuse ring connected to Islington children's homes. ( Jersey child abuse link to Islington, London)

In 1982 Margaret Hodge (nee Oppenheimer) became Islington council leader.

She became a close friend of Tony Blair, who lived in Islington, a few doors away from Hodge.

In February 1990 Liz Davies and David Cofie, senior social workers, discovered evidence of sex abuse of children and reported it to a residents' meeting attended by Mrs Hodge.

In May 1990 Mr Cofie and Ms Davies were told by Lyn Cusack, assistant director of social services, to stop interviewing children about the abuse claims.

On 1 May 1997 Tony Blair moved from Islington to Downing Street.

In June 2003 Mrs Hodge was made minister for Children.
(Another minister under fire: call for Hodge to quit over child ...)

The Independent, 9 March 2008, has an article on missing children (Our children are missing: Most vulnerable youngsters are targeted) which tells us the following:

Sarah Benford, 14, disappeared from Welford House children's home in Northampton in April 2000.

She is still missing.

The UK's Police National Missing Persons Bureau has 1,418 "open cases" of missing children.

According to Police figures more than 100 children who should be in care have been missing for at least four years.

Many children who go missing are not reported to the police.

Member of parliament Helen Southworth says: "All figures on children missing from anywhere are estimates because, astonishingly, there is no requirement for data to be recorded or collected nationally."

Almost 1,000 children went missing from UK residential and foster care in 2007.

The number that went missing from care increased from 570 in 1997 to 950 in 2007.

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